Discussion:
Can you clarify the right answer for the free $200MB/month on my old iPad
(too old to reply)
Gabrielle Lejeune
2014-03-05 20:30:41 UTC
Permalink
I have an old at&t ipad with cellular.
I think it's called first generation ipad.
It doesn't even have a camera.
I have never activated the sim card on at&t.

Today I went to a t-mobile store and asked for the "free" 200MB/month.

They first said the iPad was locked but I insisted it was unlocked
and they finally (after much argument) gave me the data-only sim card.

However it was not free, and they said it "shuts down" after 200MB.

It cost $10 for the sim card.
And, they said it would never get 4g even if 4g is available.
And they said it shuts down after 200MB.

It was "my" understanding that none of that was true.
That's why I ask you.
Can you clarify me the right answer?
nospam
2014-03-05 20:52:58 UTC
Permalink
In article <lf81hh$ftk$***@speranza.aioe.org>, Gabrielle Lejeune
<***@xxxgmail.com> wrote:

> I have an old at&t ipad with cellular.
> I think it's called first generation ipad.
> It doesn't even have a camera.
> I have never activated the sim card on at&t.

that's definitely a 1st gen ipad.

> Today I went to a t-mobile store and asked for the "free" 200MB/month.
>
> They first said the iPad was locked but I insisted it was unlocked

all ipads are unlocked.

> and they finally (after much argument) gave me the data-only sim card.

there isn't actually a difference with the sims. the only thing that
matters is that it's a micro-sim, so that it fits into the sim slot.

> However it was not free, and they said it "shuts down" after 200MB.

it does, unless you sign up for a higher tier plan.

> It cost $10 for the sim card.

most stores like to charge for a sim card, but sometimes they'll give
you one for free, especially if you're already a customer. otherwise,
they want the money.

t-mobile's web site often discounts them to a buck or two or even free
every so often, but that won't help you now.

or, you can get them off ebay for a couple of bucks.

> And, they said it would never get 4g even if 4g is available.

it won't get lte because the 1st gen ipad does not have lte.

however, it will get 3g if the area in which you're using it has
refarmed the network, which is pretty much everywhere. however, there
are still some spots that have not and are using the old frequencies.

if their network hasn't been refarmed, then the speed will be 2g/edge.
that's fine for casual use like email or checking weather, but it won't
be particularly enjoyable for web surfing and certainly not video
(although you'd burn right through 200m with video).

> And they said it shuts down after 200MB.
>
> It was "my" understanding that none of that was true.

some of it was.

> That's why I ask you.
> Can you clarify me the right answer?

the right answer is that t-mobile offers 200 meg for free for tablets
(not phones). no special sim is needed. just go to settings on the ipad
and activate it. obtaining the sim can be free but that won't stop
someone from trying to sell one.

it's possible that activating it in settings won't work, in which case
you may need to call or go to the store so they can enter the iccid
into their system. if that happens, be sure you get someone who knows
about the proper plan. a lot of t-mobile representatives do not and
make up stuff to not look stupid.
Gabrielle Lejeune
2014-03-05 21:24:51 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 05 Mar 2014 15:52:58 -0500, nospam wrote:

> t-mobile offers 200 meg for free for tablets
> (not phones). no special sim is needed. just go to settings on the ipad
> and activate it. obtaining the sim can be free but that won't stop
> someone from trying to sell one.

Thank you for all the clarifications.

Does the 200MB/month just *die* when it reaches the limit, or does
it just slow down so that you can still use it, but it's slow?

The ads say 200MB/month of "high speed" data, so, that's why I ask.

What happens on the 201st MB?
nospam
2014-03-05 21:42:37 UTC
Permalink
In article <lf84n2$p00$***@speranza.aioe.org>, Gabrielle Lejeune
<***@xxxgmail.com> wrote:

> > t-mobile offers 200 meg for free for tablets
> > (not phones). no special sim is needed. just go to settings on the ipad
> > and activate it. obtaining the sim can be free but that won't stop
> > someone from trying to sell one.
>
> Thank you for all the clarifications.
>
> Does the 200MB/month just *die* when it reaches the limit, or does
> it just slow down so that you can still use it, but it's slow?

i've never hit the limit, but since there's no credit card needed to
sign up, i can't see how it would let you go past that no matter what.
the idea is to get you hooked so you sign up for a paid tier.

with other t-mobile plans, it does slow down when you hit a certain
limit. there is a $3/day unlimited data on their normal pay/go, with
the first 200 meg at 3g/4g speeds, but that's a different plan
entirely.

> The ads say 200MB/month of "high speed" data, so, that's why I ask.

it's however fast your ipad can manage, which for 1st gen is 3g, unless
you're in an non-refarmed area, in which case it's 2g speeds because
t-mobile used a non-standard band.

the limitation is the device, not the plan. if you upgrade the ipad, it
will be faster (assuming you're in a refarmed area).

> What happens on the 201st MB?

it doesn't work.
tlvp
2014-03-06 06:48:52 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 05 Mar 2014 16:42:37 -0500, nospam wrote:

> In article <lf84n2$p00$***@speranza.aioe.org>, Gabrielle Lejeune
> <***@xxxgmail.com> wrote:
>
>>> t-mobile offers 200 meg for free for tablets
>>> (not phones). no special sim is needed. just go to settings on the ipad
>>> and activate it. obtaining the sim can be free but that won't stop
>>> someone from trying to sell one.
>>
>> Thank you for all the clarifications.
>>
>> Does the 200MB/month just *die* when it reaches the limit, or does
>> it just slow down so that you can still use it, but it's slow?
>
> i've never hit the limit, but since there's no credit card needed to
> sign up, i can't see how it would let you go past that no matter what.
> the idea is to get you hooked so you sign up for a paid tier.
>
> with other t-mobile plans, it does slow down when you hit a certain
> limit. there is a $3/day unlimited data on their normal pay/go, with
> the first 200 meg at 3g/4g speeds, but that's a different plan
> entirely.
>
>> The ads say 200MB/month of "high speed" data, so, that's why I ask.
>
> it's however fast your ipad can manage, which for 1st gen is 3g, unless
> you're in an non-refarmed area, in which case it's 2g speeds because
> t-mobile used a non-standard band.
>
> the limitation is the device, not the plan. if you upgrade the ipad, it
> will be faster (assuming you're in a refarmed area).
>
>> What happens on the 201st MB?
>
> it doesn't work.

What's to stop someone from going to another T-Mo store and getting a
second 200 MB data SIM for the same iPad? Just curious. Cheers, -- tlvp
--
Avant de repondre, jeter la poubelle, SVP.
nospam
2014-03-06 12:42:47 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@40tude.net>, tlvp
<***@att.net> wrote:

> What's to stop someone from going to another T-Mo store and getting a
> second 200 MB data SIM for the same iPad? Just curious. Cheers, -- tlvp

nothing. it's a bit of a hassle to swap but you could do that if you
really wanted to.
Doug Anderson
2014-03-06 15:58:33 UTC
Permalink
tlvp <***@att.net> writes:

> On Wed, 05 Mar 2014 16:42:37 -0500, nospam wrote:
>
> > In article <lf84n2$p00$***@speranza.aioe.org>, Gabrielle Lejeune
> > <***@xxxgmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >>> t-mobile offers 200 meg for free for tablets
> >>> (not phones). no special sim is needed. just go to settings on the ipad
> >>> and activate it. obtaining the sim can be free but that won't stop
> >>> someone from trying to sell one.
> >>
> >> Thank you for all the clarifications.
> >>
> >> Does the 200MB/month just *die* when it reaches the limit, or does
> >> it just slow down so that you can still use it, but it's slow?
> >
> > i've never hit the limit, but since there's no credit card needed to
> > sign up, i can't see how it would let you go past that no matter what.
> > the idea is to get you hooked so you sign up for a paid tier.
> >
> > with other t-mobile plans, it does slow down when you hit a certain
> > limit. there is a $3/day unlimited data on their normal pay/go, with
> > the first 200 meg at 3g/4g speeds, but that's a different plan
> > entirely.
> >
> >> The ads say 200MB/month of "high speed" data, so, that's why I ask.
> >
> > it's however fast your ipad can manage, which for 1st gen is 3g, unless
> > you're in an non-refarmed area, in which case it's 2g speeds because
> > t-mobile used a non-standard band.
> >
> > the limitation is the device, not the plan. if you upgrade the ipad, it
> > will be faster (assuming you're in a refarmed area).
> >
> >> What happens on the 201st MB?
> >
> > it doesn't work.
>
> What's to stop someone from going to another T-Mo store and getting a
> second 200 MB data SIM for the same iPad? Just curious. Cheers, --
> tlvp

Since T-Mobile charges for their SIMs, this turns into an expensive
data plan (200MB for $10). At least in the short term.

I suppose if you spring for 5 SIMs, you have 1GB per month for $50.
nospam
2014-03-06 16:09:03 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@ethel.the.log>, Doug Anderson
<***@gmail.com> wrote:

> > What's to stop someone from going to another T-Mo store and getting a
> > second 200 MB data SIM for the same iPad? Just curious. Cheers, --
> > tlvp
>
> Since T-Mobile charges for their SIMs, this turns into an expensive
> data plan (200MB for $10). At least in the short term.

incorrect.

the t-mobile stores often charge $10 but not always. they are also
often clueless and will want to sell you a paid plan.

the t-mobile site often offers the sims for free or sometimes for a
buck or two.

the sims can be found for a few bucks pretty much anytime elsewhere.

if you need a sim *today* you may not have a choice, otherwise, wait
until they are free.

anyone who pays $10 for a sim is not a savvy shopper.

> I suppose if you spring for 5 SIMs, you have 1GB per month for $50.

even if you do pay for 5 sims, it's a one time expense. consider it
part of the price of the tablet.
Liam O'Connor
2014-03-08 20:48:10 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 06 Mar 2014 11:09:03 -0500, nospam wrote:

> the t-mobile stores often charge $10 but not always. they are also
> often clueless and will want to sell you a paid plan.

Do I interpret this web page correctly that it's 99 cents
per SIM card today?

https://www.t-mobile.com/landing/bring-your-own-tablet.html
nospam
2014-03-08 20:49:57 UTC
Permalink
In article
<c7533$531b8214$43da7656$***@nntpswitch.blueworldhosting.com>, Liam
O'Connor <***@example.com> wrote:

> > the t-mobile stores often charge $10 but not always. they are also
> > often clueless and will want to sell you a paid plan.
>
> Do I interpret this web page correctly that it's 99 cents
> per SIM card today?
>
> https://www.t-mobile.com/landing/bring-your-own-tablet.html

sure looks like it.

and if you go to a store, the store will probably want $10 even though
the web site says less.
M. John Matlaw
2014-03-27 23:49:51 UTC
Permalink
On 3/8/14, 3:49 PM, nospam wrote:
> In article
> <c7533$531b8214$43da7656$***@nntpswitch.blueworldhosting.com>, Liam
> O'Connor <***@example.com> wrote:
>
>>> the t-mobile stores often charge $10 but not always. they are also
>>> often clueless and will want to sell you a paid plan.
>>
>> Do I interpret this web page correctly that it's 99 cents
>> per SIM card today?
>>
>> https://www.t-mobile.com/landing/bring-your-own-tablet.html
>
> sure looks like it.
>
> and if you go to a store, the store will probably want $10 even though
> the web site says less.
>
Today's another 99 cent day. Spotted it on the t-mobile site but when I
went through the on-line order it looked like I'd also be unable to
order it without springing for a $30 a month data plan. So I called 'em
up. By phone I was able to get the nano sim without the the $30 plan.
They even said it'd go for free with free shipping though they did take
down my credit card number and said I'd be billed the the dollar but
it'd be credited back after I fired up the 200mb plan. Sounds like
it'll work out. It's shipping USPS and should be here in two to four
days. I've cancelled the Verizon $20 for 1gb plan and checked to make
sure I wouldn't have a problem removing the nano sim. It all looks
good. Hoping for the best. I wonder, though. I'm betting I'll be
constantly bombarded with with t-mobile upgrade offers. For a free
200mb I guess I can live with that.
tlvp
2014-03-09 00:04:08 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 06 Mar 2014 11:09:03 -0500, nospam wrote:

> ... the t-mobile site often offers the sims for free or sometimes for a
> buck or two. ...

Had a look on a T-Mo site earlier today. Data SIMS they wanted $10 for;
voice SIMS were free. Not quite sure how they can tell the difference.

Cheers, -- tlvp
--
Avant de repondre, jeter la poubelle, SVP.
nospam
2014-03-09 03:43:13 UTC
Permalink
In article <vfjm6eqnabfl.1bjw2vjc4835$***@40tude.net>, tlvp
<***@att.net> wrote:

> > ... the t-mobile site often offers the sims for free or sometimes for a
> > buck or two. ...
>
> Had a look on a T-Mo site earlier today. Data SIMS they wanted $10 for;
> voice SIMS were free. Not quite sure how they can tell the difference.

there is no difference, other than how they're marketed.
Liam O'Connor
2014-03-09 05:37:02 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 08 Mar 2014 22:43:13 -0500, nospam wrote:

> there is no difference, other than how they're marketed.

I don't know enough to disagree with you, so I won't.
But, I will say T-Mobile told me, over the phone, that
they're "different".

Are they different?
I do not know.

This Wikipedia article is a bit technical for me, but,
I don't see anything saying that they're different:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subscriber_identity_module
nospam
2014-03-09 06:10:18 UTC
Permalink
In article
<48ea9$531bfe0b$43da7656$***@nntpswitch.blueworldhosting.com>, Liam
O'Connor <***@example.com> wrote:

> On Sat, 08 Mar 2014 22:43:13 -0500, nospam wrote:
>
> > there is no difference, other than how they're marketed.
>
> I don't know enough to disagree with you, so I won't.
> But, I will say T-Mobile told me, over the phone, that
> they're "different".

i don't know how much you've spoken to t-mobile reps, but you will get
a different answer every time you call.

obviously, not all of the answers can be correct, and it's not unusual
if none of them are.

this is unfortunately, not unique to t-mobile.

> Are they different?
> I do not know.

i do and there is no difference.

what matters is how it's provisioned, i.e., what plan you activate.
Liam O'Connor
2014-03-10 14:39:07 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 09 Mar 2014 01:10:18 -0500, nospam wrote:

> what matters is how it's provisioned, i.e., what plan you activate.

Thanks for that confirmation.

I don't disagree one bit that you can get a different answer
every time you call them. Sometimes I tell them "just don't
make stuff up, ok?".

I know it works when they put me on hold for a long time. :)

I always ask what their names are, and whether they'll call
me back if we're disconnected. That keeps them from doing
the funny business of "ooops" (although it still happens).
Doug Anderson
2014-03-09 19:07:20 UTC
Permalink
Liam O'Connor <***@example.com> writes:

> On Sat, 08 Mar 2014 22:43:13 -0500, nospam wrote:
>
> > there is no difference, other than how they're marketed.
>
> I don't know enough to disagree with you, so I won't.
> But, I will say T-Mobile told me, over the phone, that
> they're "different".
>
> Are they different?
> I do not know.

I don't believe that they are different, but I could be wrong.

However, what a t-mobile CRS tells you on the phone is no evidence for
anything. Not that the rep is lying, but that they simply don't
necessarily know anything.

I say this in _spite_ of the fact that in the US I've dealt with AT&T,
Verizon, T-Mobile and StraightTalk. And T-Mobile has by far the
_best_ customer service!
DevilsPGD
2014-03-10 04:10:21 UTC
Permalink
In the last episode of
<48ea9$531bfe0b$43da7656$***@nntpswitch.blueworldhosting.com>, Liam
O'Connor <***@example.com> said:

>On Sat, 08 Mar 2014 22:43:13 -0500, nospam wrote:
>
>> there is no difference, other than how they're marketed.
>
>I don't know enough to disagree with you, so I won't.
>But, I will say T-Mobile told me, over the phone, that
>they're "different".
>
>Are they different?
>I do not know.
>
>This Wikipedia article is a bit technical for me, but,
>I don't see anything saying that they're different:
>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subscriber_identity_module

They're likely physically identical, but programmed with different
classes of service.

A lot of carriers have "iPad Preactivated" SIMs that are able to use the
iPad's own online signup process (which actually requires a cellular
connection and limited data connection, usually on a dedicated APN),
while a normal SIM may not be programmed to use that APN at all.

There's no reason that such a thing can't be done when the store or
network activates the SIM, but from a corporate perspective, it's
probably just easier to have them already preactivated and in the
correct physical bin.

--
Getting married for sex is like buying a 747 for the free peanuts
-- Jeff Foxworthy
nospam
2014-03-10 04:50:13 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@4ax.com>, DevilsPGD
<***@crazyhat.net> wrote:

> They're likely physically identical, but programmed with different
> classes of service.

the sims are the same and the service is a function of the plan that's
activated. they don't know in advance what service you're going to be
using.

> A lot of carriers have "iPad Preactivated" SIMs that are able to use the
> iPad's own online signup process (which actually requires a cellular
> connection and limited data connection, usually on a dedicated APN),
> while a normal SIM may not be programmed to use that APN at all.

sims are not preactivated and the apn is in a carrier bundle.

any sim will work (although on occasion there might be a glitch).

once activated and if you let it expire, you may need to get a new sim
to reactivate it again.
DevilsPGD
2014-03-10 08:15:20 UTC
Permalink
In the last episode of <100320140050136187%***@nospam.invalid>,
nospam <***@nospam.invalid> said:

>In article <***@4ax.com>, DevilsPGD
><***@crazyhat.net> wrote:
>
>> They're likely physically identical, but programmed with different
>> classes of service.
>
>the sims are the same and the service is a function of the plan that's
>activated. they don't know in advance what service you're going to be
>using.

TELUS, in particular, has general-use SIMs and iPad-specific SIMs that
are provisioned differently. They can be programmed to each other's
capabilities, but the out-of-the-box provisioning is different.

>> A lot of carriers have "iPad Preactivated" SIMs that are able to use the
>> iPad's own online signup process (which actually requires a cellular
>> connection and limited data connection, usually on a dedicated APN),
>> while a normal SIM may not be programmed to use that APN at all.
>
>sims are not preactivated and the apn is in a carrier bundle.
>
>any sim will work (although on occasion there might be a glitch).

No, there's a definite difference between the TELUS ones labeled "iPad
preactivated" and not. Namely, you can pop the preactivated ones into an
iPad and buy service from the device without talking to anyone, whereas
the other ones need to be added to a service or activated for iPad
service, otherwise they read "No Service" until they're activated.

The APN is on the SIM, not the carrier bundle because the carrier bundle
isn't necessarily on the device until service is activated.

--
I don't want to have to kill you twice.
nospam
2014-03-10 12:20:14 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@4ax.com>, DevilsPGD
<***@crazyhat.net> wrote:

> >> A lot of carriers have "iPad Preactivated" SIMs that are able to use the
> >> iPad's own online signup process (which actually requires a cellular
> >> connection and limited data connection, usually on a dedicated APN),
> >> while a normal SIM may not be programmed to use that APN at all.
> >
> >sims are not preactivated and the apn is in a carrier bundle.
> >
> >any sim will work (although on occasion there might be a glitch).
>
> No, there's a definite difference between the TELUS ones labeled "iPad
> preactivated" and not. Namely, you can pop the preactivated ones into an
> iPad and buy service from the device without talking to anyone, whereas
> the other ones need to be added to a service or activated for iPad
> service, otherwise they read "No Service" until they're activated.

i don't know about telus, but that's definitely not the case for any
sim in the usa.

i've yet to buy an ipad specific sim or a paygo specific sim. they're
all the same.

> The APN is on the SIM, not the carrier bundle because the carrier bundle
> isn't necessarily on the device until service is activated.

the apn is in the carrier bundle, and updates can be pushed if needed
when the device is activated/synced.
Liam O'Connor
2014-03-10 15:01:35 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 10 Mar 2014 08:20:14 -0400, nospam wrote:

> i've yet to buy an ipad specific sim or a paygo specific sim.
> they're all the same.

I just ran an experiment with two different cellular iPads:

iPad1:
Settings->Cellular Data->Cellular Data Usage->Current Period->1.2MB
Settings->General->About->Cellular Data Number=408-xxx-yyy1

iPad2:
Settings->Cellular Data->Cellular Data Usage->Current Period->0.1KB
Settings->General->About->Cellular Data Number=408-xxx-yyy2

The data connection worked on my initial tests, which was just
to bring up Google Maps and see if the traffic showed up.

It did!

So, at least one thing is clear.
The SIM card on the iPads are interchangable.
(So, presumably you can get the free 200MB/month x2 at least.)

I can't try the same experiment on my Android phones, as they
are all microSIM (and not nanoSIM whch the iPad uses).
Liam O'Connor
2014-03-10 15:15:24 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 10 Mar 2014 08:01:35 -0700, Liam O'Connor wrote:

> So, at least one thing is clear.
> The SIM card on the iPads are interchangable.
> (So, presumably you can get the free 200MB/month x2 at least.)

I should mention that I switched the nano SIM cards from
two iPads, both of which are on the same "account" (since
I own them both).

So, now the question will be whether T-Mobile would allow
me to ADD a third or fourth (etc) nano SIM to the account.

I will try to order a third/fourth 99-cent SIM later today
in order to test that theory.
http://www.t-mobile.com/landing/free-mobile-internet-data.html

I will also call T-Mobile to ask if they allow multiple SIM
cards to get the free 200MB/month.
Liam O'Connor
2014-03-08 20:50:27 UTC
Permalink
On 06 Mar 2014 07:58:33 -0800, Doug Anderson wrote:

> I suppose if you spring for 5 SIMs, you have 1GB per month for $50.

The NRE is pretty good on this.

Let's say, you have the 5 SIMs for, oh, say, the 2 or 3 year
life of the device.

That's $50/24 to 36 months, or, roughly a couple of bucks
a month for 1GB/month of high-speed data.

Still, I would *think* T-Mobile would be on to that trick.

Can they identify the actual iPad by IMEI or something?
nospam
2014-03-08 20:53:52 UTC
Permalink
In article
<73d7f$531b829d$43da7656$***@nntpswitch.blueworldhosting.com>, Liam
O'Connor <***@example.com> wrote:

> Can they identify the actual iPad by IMEI or something?

yes, and supposedly the sim is tied to the device in which it was
originally activated.

that means you won't be able to swap from one device to another but you
can have a stack of sims for one particular device.

however, i've not tested it.
Liam O'Connor
2014-03-09 03:14:06 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 08 Mar 2014 15:53:52 -0500, nospam wrote:

> yes, and supposedly the sim is tied to the device in which it was
> originally activated.

Now *that* would be different than with voice SIM cards!

With voice SIM cards, you can swap at will between devices
(assuming they're unlocked devices such as all iPads are).

I hadn't known that you can't swap data SIM cards between
devices.
nospam
2014-03-09 03:43:15 UTC
Permalink
In article
<8ce82$531bdc89$43da7656$***@nntpswitch.blueworldhosting.com>, Liam
O'Connor <***@example.com> wrote:

> > yes, and supposedly the sim is tied to the device in which it was
> > originally activated.
>
> Now *that* would be different than with voice SIM cards!
>
> With voice SIM cards, you can swap at will between devices
> (assuming they're unlocked devices such as all iPads are).
>
> I hadn't known that you can't swap data SIM cards between
> devices.

the simlock is only for the t-mobile free plan, at least from what i've
heard. i only have one ipad and cannot test it.

this makes sense, because what they *don't* want is someone activating
the sim in an ipad and then putting it in a phone and getting free data
service on their phone rather than signing up for a normal phone plan.

ordinary paid plans, data or voice do not have a swap restriction.

however, at&t paygo voice plan will lock the sim to the device in which
it's activated if it's part of a package that includes bonus minutes,
as is usually the case when you buy a phone in a store.

a generic at&t sim won't simlock, even on a paygo plan.
Liam O'Connor
2014-03-10 15:28:27 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 08 Mar 2014 22:43:15 -0500, nospam wrote:

> the simlock is only for the t-mobile free plan, at least from what i've
> heard. i only have one ipad and cannot test it.

I only just switched it a few minutes ago, so I will test
the rest of today.

But, I snuck the wife's iPad T-Mobile 200MB/month SIM out
of her iPad, and swapped it with mine.

It seems to work. It certainly knows the phone number has
changed, and the amount of recent data also travelled with
the SIM card.

I'll test it out further today, and let you know how it
works - but it appears that you can easily swap SIM cards
between iPads.

Unfortunately, all my Android phones are microSIM so I can't
swap with the nanoSIM cards of the iPads to test on phones.
nospam
2014-03-10 16:23:10 UTC
Permalink
In article
<e021$531dda1d$43da7656$***@nntpswitch.blueworldhosting.com>, Liam
O'Connor <***@example.com> wrote:

> > the simlock is only for the t-mobile free plan, at least from what i've
> > heard. i only have one ipad and cannot test it.
>
> I only just switched it a few minutes ago, so I will test
> the rest of today.
>
> But, I snuck the wife's iPad T-Mobile 200MB/month SIM out
> of her iPad, and swapped it with mine.
>
> It seems to work. It certainly knows the phone number has
> changed, and the amount of recent data also travelled with
> the SIM card.
>
> I'll test it out further today, and let you know how it
> works - but it appears that you can easily swap SIM cards
> between iPads.

thanks for the test. it's also possible it will block later on when
their system catches up with it.

it will block in a phone though. that's been tried on the various
forums many times.
Liam O'Connor
2014-03-10 17:34:01 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 10 Mar 2014 12:23:10 -0400, nospam wrote:

> thanks for the test. it's also possible it will block later on when
> their system catches up with it.

I can't disagree with you that T-Mobile should be able to detect
that the SIM card is now in a *different* iPad from which it
was activated.

And, I don't at all disagree that they should be able to easily
block the SIM card, if they felt like it, since there is no
way I can hide the fact I swapped the two SIM cards.

I will see what happens, simply by leaving the now-swapped SIM
cards in place.

> it will block in a phone though. that's been tried on the various
> forums many times.

This is good to know because I was wondering how to run the
test (given my phones are micoSIM and not nanoSIM).
DevilsPGD
2014-03-10 04:10:21 UTC
Permalink
In the last episode of
<8ce82$531bdc89$43da7656$***@nntpswitch.blueworldhosting.com>, Liam
O'Connor <***@example.com> said:

>On Sat, 08 Mar 2014 15:53:52 -0500, nospam wrote:
>
>> yes, and supposedly the sim is tied to the device in which it was
>> originally activated.
>
>Now *that* would be different than with voice SIM cards!
>
>With voice SIM cards, you can swap at will between devices
>(assuming they're unlocked devices such as all iPads are).

You can physically do so with the free-data SIMs too, but they network
might detect it and shut it down.

Consider that I can use my carrier's app to see what type of device is
currently using a particular SIM. If someone on my corporate account
moves their SIM from a BlackBerry to an iOS device, I'll get a message
that their BlackBerry plan is being deactivated (they pay BlackBerry a
monthly fee for each active device)

There's no reason that a carrier couldn't flip a SIM on or off based on
the device it's inserted into, if they wanted. Generally they don't,
since they want paying customers to keep paying, but in the case of a
free plan or deeply discounted plan... Anything could happen.

--
Getting married for sex is like buying a 747 for the free peanuts
-- Jeff Foxworthy
Liam O'Connor
2014-03-10 17:35:20 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 09 Mar 2014 21:10:21 -0700, DevilsPGD wrote:

> There's no reason that a carrier couldn't flip a SIM on or off based on
> the device it's inserted into, if they wanted. Generally they don't,
> since they want paying customers to keep paying, but in the case of a
> free plan or deeply discounted plan... Anything could happen.

To test that sequence, I will leave the SIM cards swapped, for
now, between the two iPads.

I have no doubt T-Mobile notices, immediately, the swap.

Time will tell if they're going to do anything about it though.
DevilsPGD
2014-03-10 23:50:31 UTC
Permalink
In the last episode of
<44eb8$531df7da$43da7656$***@nntpswitch.blueworldhosting.com>, Liam
O'Connor <***@example.com> said:

>On Sun, 09 Mar 2014 21:10:21 -0700, DevilsPGD wrote:
>
>> There's no reason that a carrier couldn't flip a SIM on or off based on
>> the device it's inserted into, if they wanted. Generally they don't,
>> since they want paying customers to keep paying, but in the case of a
>> free plan or deeply discounted plan... Anything could happen.
>
>To test that sequence, I will leave the SIM cards swapped, for
>now, between the two iPads.
>
>I have no doubt T-Mobile notices, immediately, the swap.
>
>Time will tell if they're going to do anything about it though.

They also might care a lot more about a non-eligible device vs an
eligible device, depending on the rationale behind the free data.

If it's a marketing promotion by T-Mobile to attract customers with the
hope of upselling larger packages or voice service, it would make sense
to be quite tolerant about the data plan, whereas if it's Apple funding
part of the cost (like Amazon does with it's 3G Kindles that can
download books free anywhere in the world) then it would make sense for
T-Mobile to limit the service fairly strictly so as to not get stuck
holding a bill.

Either way, killing the SIM has a non-trivial customer service manpower
cost, as long as giving away a bit of free data costs less than dealing
with the customer service costs of addressing the customer inquiries
when a customer locks their SIM out, it might make sense to give a bit
of a leash anyway.

So it's hard to tell, big corporations do a lot of things for reasons
that don't always make sense to an outsider (or even an insider, in many
cases)

--
Critics are like eunuchs in a harem: they know how it's done, they've
seen it done every day, but they're unable to do it themselves.
nospam
2014-03-11 00:27:12 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@4ax.com>, DevilsPGD
<***@crazyhat.net> wrote:

> >> There's no reason that a carrier couldn't flip a SIM on or off based on
> >> the device it's inserted into, if they wanted. Generally they don't,
> >> since they want paying customers to keep paying, but in the case of a
> >> free plan or deeply discounted plan... Anything could happen.
> >
> >To test that sequence, I will leave the SIM cards swapped, for
> >now, between the two iPads.
> >
> >I have no doubt T-Mobile notices, immediately, the swap.
> >
> >Time will tell if they're going to do anything about it though.
>
> They also might care a lot more about a non-eligible device vs an
> eligible device, depending on the rationale behind the free data.
>
> If it's a marketing promotion by T-Mobile to attract customers with the
> hope of upselling larger packages or voice service, it would make sense
> to be quite tolerant about the data plan, whereas if it's Apple funding
> part of the cost (like Amazon does with it's 3G Kindles that can
> download books free anywhere in the world) then it would make sense for
> T-Mobile to limit the service fairly strictly so as to not get stuck
> holding a bill.

apple isn't funding it. t-mobile, being the #4 carrier, is doing a lot
of things to attract new users. offering 200m free is one way to get
people in the door, especially when they have excess capacity, with the
hopes of signing up to a paid plan.

> Either way, killing the SIM has a non-trivial customer service manpower
> cost, as long as giving away a bit of free data costs less than dealing
> with the customer service costs of addressing the customer inquiries
> when a customer locks their SIM out, it might make sense to give a bit
> of a leash anyway.

they don't kill the sim. they just block it in a different device. put
it back in the original device and it works like it's supposed to.

the user knows exactly why it doesn't work, since they swapped the sim
in an attempt to get something to which they are not entitled.

the most common case is blocking usb data sticks with a phone sim, when
the voice plan does not support tethering and/or unlimited data.
Liam O'Connor
2014-03-11 15:19:10 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 10 Mar 2014 20:27:12 -0400, nospam wrote:

> they don't kill the sim. they just block it in a different device. put
> it back in the original device and it works like it's supposed to.

Day 1 and the swap is still working.

I do agree though, with the arguments that "my" test swaps a SIM card
between two similar devices, both of which are under the same account.

So, it would be the least egregious to T-Mobile, since the SIM is staying
with the same customer and type of device.

But I'll keep tabs on whether it works, long term, and let people know.
nospam
2014-03-11 16:08:17 UTC
Permalink
In article
<2b66b$531f2972$43da7656$***@nntpswitch.blueworldhosting.com>, Liam
O'Connor <***@example.com> wrote:

> > they don't kill the sim. they just block it in a different device. put
> > it back in the original device and it works like it's supposed to.
>
> Day 1 and the swap is still working.
>
> I do agree though, with the arguments that "my" test swaps a SIM card
> between two similar devices, both of which are under the same account.

what do you mean under the same account?

the free plan is its own independent account.

it's not part of a 'family plan' of multiple devices under the same
account. if you have a plan that includes multiple devices, then there
is no restriction on swapping because it's all one 'account'.
Liam O'Connor
2014-03-11 17:50:56 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 11 Mar 2014 12:08:17 -0400, nospam wrote:
> what do you mean under the same account?
> the free plan is its own independent account.
>
> it's not part of a 'family plan' of multiple devices under the same
> account. if you have a plan that includes multiple devices, then there
> is no restriction on swapping because it's all one 'account'.

Maybe I confused things, but, I think I know what you're getting
at, so, I have to explain what I think are the complexities that
T-Mobile initiated here.

Let's both agree that T-Mobile will give this free data SIM
to *anyone*, whether or not they have a T-Mobile account.

So, let's say someone is on, oh, I don't know, Verizon, for their
cell phone. They can get a T-Mobile SIM card for data on their
tablet. It does not need to be linked to their Verizon phone
account (in fact, it can't be linked to their Verizon phone account).

I agree.

However, I am on a grandfathered T-Mobile family plan. They gave
me the option of "linking" the iPads to that family plan, or not.

So, I *could* have created a separate account, with T-Mobile, for
the iPads. But, I chose to "link" it to the phone plan.

However, I did just call 611 just now, and I asked about this.
They said it's not really linked, so much as it's a *different*
plan altogether. So, I have, in effect, two different plans with
T-Mobile, which are linked to the same billing address.

Or something like that...
nospam
2014-03-11 22:16:06 UTC
Permalink
In article
<9a4be$531f4d04$43da7656$***@nntpswitch.blueworldhosting.com>, Liam
O'Connor <***@example.com> wrote:

> However, I am on a grandfathered T-Mobile family plan. They gave
> me the option of "linking" the iPads to that family plan, or not.
>
> So, I *could* have created a separate account, with T-Mobile, for
> the iPads. But, I chose to "link" it to the phone plan.

then it's not the same plan.
DevilsPGD
2014-03-11 23:54:57 UTC
Permalink
In the last episode of <110320141816065316%***@nospam.invalid>,
nospam <***@nospam.invalid> said:

>In article
><9a4be$531f4d04$43da7656$***@nntpswitch.blueworldhosting.com>, Liam
>O'Connor <***@example.com> wrote:
>
>> However, I am on a grandfathered T-Mobile family plan. They gave
>> me the option of "linking" the iPads to that family plan, or not.
>>
>> So, I *could* have created a separate account, with T-Mobile, for
>> the iPads. But, I chose to "link" it to the phone plan.
>
>then it's not the same plan.

No -- But it's another qualified device, so why would they pull the
plug? Much easier to allow the SIMs to work on any qualifying device
than to deal with the customer service overhead of tighter restrictions.

--
Q. How many Microsoft technicians does it take to change a lightbulb?
A. Three. Two to hold the ladder and one to hammer the bulb into a faucet.
nospam
2014-03-12 05:15:00 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@4ax.com>, DevilsPGD
<***@crazyhat.net> wrote:

> >> However, I am on a grandfathered T-Mobile family plan. They gave
> >> me the option of "linking" the iPads to that family plan, or not.
> >>
> >> So, I *could* have created a separate account, with T-Mobile, for
> >> the iPads. But, I chose to "link" it to the phone plan.
> >
> >then it's not the same plan.
>
> No -- But it's another qualified device, so why would they pull the
> plug? Much easier to allow the SIMs to work on any qualifying device
> than to deal with the customer service overhead of tighter restrictions.

the free plan is qualified differently than a family plan. it doesn't
have any payment info or even a name associated with it. because of
that, it has additional restrictions than one associated with a more
traditional plan.
DevilsPGD
2014-03-14 03:18:31 UTC
Permalink
In the last episode of <120320140115003270%***@nospam.invalid>,
nospam <***@nospam.invalid> said:

>In article <***@4ax.com>, DevilsPGD
><***@crazyhat.net> wrote:
>
>> >> However, I am on a grandfathered T-Mobile family plan. They gave
>> >> me the option of "linking" the iPads to that family plan, or not.
>> >>
>> >> So, I *could* have created a separate account, with T-Mobile, for
>> >> the iPads. But, I chose to "link" it to the phone plan.
>> >
>> >then it's not the same plan.
>>
>> No -- But it's another qualified device, so why would they pull the
>> plug? Much easier to allow the SIMs to work on any qualifying device
>> than to deal with the customer service overhead of tighter restrictions.
>
>the free plan is qualified differently than a family plan. it doesn't
>have any payment info or even a name associated with it. because of
>that, it has additional restrictions than one associated with a more
>traditional plan.

Totally. If I ever head toward the US again, I'll grab one myself. Just
the same, it makes sense to not be too restrictive because it annoys
customers and generates customer service calls, which is the opposite of
the point of these plans.

--
There's your answer, Fishbulb.
Liam O'Connor
2014-03-08 20:42:34 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 6 Mar 2014 01:48:52 -0500, tlvp wrote:

> What's to stop someone from going to another T-Mo store and getting a
> second 200 MB data SIM for the same iPad? Just curious. Cheers, -- tlvp

Interesting.
I have two iPads.
I will try to switch the SIM card, and see what happens.
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